No Charge for You!

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Power has to come from somewhere – if you want to power things.

In Chyna, there is not enough power – electricity – to power the electric cars that need it in order to move under their own power. Which of course they don’t, really. The electric car’s motor does not generate power; it consumes it.

The power to run it must be generated first.

What happens when there isn’t enough generating capacity to provide a sufficiency of it? EV charging stations no longer have power – and the electric cars that need it in order to move no longer do.

This is happening, right now – in Chyna.

In Sichuan province, where a persistent drought has slashed hydro-electrical power generation, resulting in the rationing of power. And the turning off of power at Tesla “supercharging” stations. According to news reports, dozens of them have been turned off, leaving owners of Tesla EVs no way to power up.

At least, not “fast.”

It is possible to recharge an electric car without plugging it in to grid power – if you have enough solar power and the necessary equipment to convert and instill it. But that isn’t inexpensive or easy, especially if you would like to “fast” rather than trickle-charge your EV.

“Fast” charging requires commercial-grade electrical wiring – as in the wiring you do not have at home.

If you can’t “fast” charge it, instead of waiting only 30-45 minutes at a commercial-grade “fast” charging station to get moving again you’ll be waiting eight or nine hours at home to get moving again.  If you have home solar. And if you can’t trickle-charge it, you won’t be moving again, at all.

At least, not until grid power comes back on.

This is a growing problem – as regards EVs specifically – because there isn’t enough grid power to add their draw – which is enormous – to the existing draw, as from other private and commercial electrically powered things that also need power in order to run, such as home (and office) air conditioning/heat pumps, stoves and other appliances, water pumps, lights and so on.

The existing draw (or load, if you prefer) is already on the verge of too much for the generating capacity that exists – in Chyna and elsewhere.

Including here.

Hence the threat of “brownouts” and energy rationing here, too – even before electric cars become a major draw on the existing capacity.

Adding draw (load) without increasing capacity means it is a certainty there will not be enough power to keep everything running. It means there will have to be a reduction in demand – as by limiting (that is to say rationing) the power available.

Will it take the form of no AC for you? Or no charge for you? It must be one – or the other – absent an increase in generating capacity to meet the increased demand.

This is a physical fact that speaks volumes about political intent.

That being precisely to ration energy – and personal transportation – once both are under centralized control.

One of the problems with cars that are not electrically powered – from the standpoint of centralized controllers – is that they are much harder to control. They run on decentralized power that’s independent of the grid. Or at least, not completely dependent upon it. If the grid electrical power is turned off, the electrically powered pumps that transfer the gas (and diesel) from underground tanks into your vehicle’s fuel tank won’t run. But if the station has a gas or diesel (or CNG) powered generator, it will.

If you have a full tank of gas (or diesel) your car will move – even if the power goes out. Even if the tank is empty. If you have a full five gallon jug in the garage.

The range of your vehicle cannot be decreased, either – as via the sending of an “over the air update or just from sitting, unused. EV batteries lose power even when the vehicle isn’t being used because that’s what happens to unused batteries – when they’re not being “topped off’ while they sit – and because the temperature of EV batteries must be maintained just-right via heaters and coolers, which use . . . electricity.  

But the main point that’s relevant is that there is more than enough oil to power every non-electric car on the planet, without any need to ration it. Much less ration the electrical power needed to make AC systems, heat pumps, well pumps, washers and dryers and all of the other things that require electrical power work – because powering non-electric cars does not decrease the amount of electricity available to power those other things.

But then, that is precisely the “problem,” from the standpoint of those herding us toward a consolidated, centralized, one-size-fits-all in order to control all energy model. It is why the “problem” of “climate change” – and carbon dioxide “emissions” was created, just as the “virus” and “pandemic” were created – for the same fundamental reason.

If you’re someone who still believes the “climate” is “changing” and desperate measures are necessary, remember it is the same people who told you that “masks” will prevent you from getting and spreading a “virus” that didn’t kill 99.8-something percent of the population – and that you’d better take a “safe” and “effective” “vaccine” – who are telling you that.

. . .

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58 COMMENTS

  1. This is an excellent article about the coming “controlled demolition” (aka Great Reset) of the EU that’s about to “hit the fan” in the coming months:

    https://thegoodcitizen.substack.com/p/europes-virtuous-suicide

    “Have Germans learned nothing from blindly following governments?” -Andrew Tate

    I have a feeling that this “second act” (covid hoax being “act one”) is going to be quite shocking and will dwarf the government-imposed destruction of the first.

  2. Newest directive from the wef…

    “Inflation Reduction Act” more ESG money handouts…

    the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 (IRA) also includes $300 billion worth of grants and incentives for green bs. The goal of the incentives is to accelerate electric vehicle adoption, green ports, increase renewable energy capacity and support products made in the U.S.

    The tax credit for purchasing an EV covers the price difference between a diesel truck and an electric truck, or 30% of the truck’s purchase price, whichever is lower. But it’s capped at $40,000 per vehicle purchase. good for china where all the components come from.

    The IRA also includes a credit for building EV charging infrastructure of up to $100,000 per charger. good for china where they all come from.

    The IRA includes production and investment tax credits for battery storage and renewable wind and solar energy
    The IRA is expected to drastically increase the demand for components needed in solar panels, wind turbines and EVs. all supplied from china

    The National Association of Manufacturers “remains staunchly opposed to the IRA. It increases taxes on manufacturers in America, undermining our competitiveness, only helps china

    The IRA includes $3 billion in grants and rebates for port authorities and marine terminals to purchase zero-emission cargo-handling equipment ….but……it is not zero emission 95.1% of electric energy production is from dirty energy sources, 4.9% is from so called green solar and wind, which are more environmentally damaging then the 95.1%….lol

    Ev’s make up less than 3% of vehicle sales after 13 years on the market and 80+% of former ev owners say they will not buy one again…

    “The IRA includes $3 billion in grants and rebates for port authorities and marine terminals to purchase zero-emission cargo-handling equipment”

    How is an electric forklift which gets its power from a coal fired power plant zero emissions?

    The bill is nothing but a crony capitalist giveaway to EV producers. Amazon and Bexos must like it with the EV delivery truck subsidy and investment in Rivian, wonder how many lobbyists they had on the bill?, your tax money handed out the Amazon to fund their fleet.

    What gets me the worst is that there is no climate emergency, global temperatures actually falling three years, CO2 is plant food good for the environment. It is just costly virtue signaling BS by watermelons and people with their hands in the till making a buck by taxing you more or raising your electric bill.

    It’s a great time to be on the .Gov inner circle once again as the rivers of cash start to flow out to all the well connected crooks.

    In the last go around of “green free money”, the f’ing b@sterds didn’t even bother to document the “loans” they gave to all their closest friends and campaign contributors.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/economics/4-ways-inflation-reduction-act-could-impact-supply-chains

  3. I was traveling east on the I-40 awhile back and decided to stay overnight in Holbrook Az. One of the few decent hotel choices made a big show of offering 6 Tesla charging ports in the prime parking area.

    In the middle of the night I got up to walk my dog and go for a smoke. As we came back and neared the charging ports I was hearing a loud noise from behind the bushes. There, hidden about ten feet away was a giant diesel generator, grinding away to produce the juice for the teslas. So once again the true cost is never factored into this insane bullshit. The amount of diesel fuel required to charge 6 teslas at once is not inconsequential. plus the distillation and transportation to far flung places, all to maintain the illusion.

    • Hey Norman,

      Holbrook has an eerie, twilight zone feel to it. Never have felt at ease there.

      Now, that’s pretty silly about the generator, but not unexpected. In Holbrook, they could, at least, put a little field of solar panels to power the thing in the day, but I’m guessing they didn’t. It would be more efficient to drive diesel hybrids and call it a done deal.

      I’m actually pretty interested in the prospect of diesel hybrids. I think Eric has even written stories about 200 MPG (or better) vehicles using that concept. That would be pretty nice right now.

      • Hi BaDnOn,

        I would love the opportunity to get a small diesel hybrid van or truck. The best solution out there, but one that makes too much sense. It seems silly as hell having to use ‘dirty fossil fuel’ to charge the enlightened ones magic carpets.

        You’re 100% correct about Holbrook, We stayed in the La Quinta. Had a room on the third floor with a giant window facing north, out into the desert and the airstrip. I was woke by strange lights moving all about out side. Didn’t want to tell that part of the story as I’m not the woo woo type. I rarely get up for a walk and a smoke in the middle of the night. You’ll experience lots of Erie stuff if you hang around AZ long enough

        • Have spent two nights, over the past two years, in Holbrook and it always makes me feel uneasy. The area is rundown and a little “scary”, but it represents one of the few “decent” stops between Albuquerque and Flagstaff.

          Also, Norman, it appears from your posts you’re a resident of Arizona. If so, just wondering where you’re at. We live in Prescott Valley.

          • Hi James N,

            I’m in Cornville or Cornjulio as we call it, down in the dirty Verde. I lived in PV in the late 80s, at the north end of Robert rd, nothing out there then but prairie and huge Antelope herds. Its amazing how big your town has become.

            • @Norman…We’ve only been here since last November and have no reference point. We like it so far and will most likely purchase a home and stay. We were up in your area recently and ate at G’s Burgers. Love the drive between PV and Cottonwood. Our only concern is the water situation. I have little trust that the government will correct the problem.

              • The waters not a problem, population will revert to the mean, problem solved.

                That drive over Mingus is a nice little cruise. No matter how many times I drive it, it never gets old.

        • Norman,

          Interesting about the lights, and I’ve seen an interesting thing or two out at my land, so, I believe you’re right about Az.

          And yes, it diesel hybrids DO make to much sense. I’m somewhat enamored by the concept because, if need be, a person could easily harvest enough vegetable oil, given a little land to run such a vehicle, should diesel supplies be throttled or cut. I found this as well:

          https://horsepowersports.com/build-your-own-225-mpg-diesel-plug-in-hybrid/

          Also: https://buildandfly.shop/product/riley-xr3/

          Be pretty snazzy for a road trip. Guess this has been around since 2008.

          • Hey BaDnOn,

            I had a friend in Vegas who ran his Isuzu box truck off the grease, he cleaned out of restaurant traps, as part of his drain cleaning business.

            You see fair amount of funky Diesels South of the border.

            I would love to have the time for that kind of project. Diesel hybrids getting that much mPG is a game changer. I’m still trying to get my solar setup going. I think when I finally pull the pin I’ll put a couple stacks of panels on a trailer so they can be adjusted for the sun. Also an inverter and generator on the trailer. Pull anywhere power. I’m sure I could harvest a lot of sun energy at my place.

  4. VERY, VERY SCARY” MESSAGE FROM ENERGY GRID INSIDER… PREPARE NOW !!

    The grid is already way over loaded and they are shutting down fully scrubbed coal burning plants, they get ESG money for doing this.

    wind and solar only provide 4.9% of all electrical power, they are the so called green energy…lol.

    NOTE: wind turbines and solar are not green, they are far more environmentally damaging then any other source.

    It takes 10 to 15 years to expand the grid so there will be no electricity to charge your lithium fire bomb battery, very dirty, polluting EV.

    Are they going to shut down the other 95.1% non green sources of all electrical production? It will be back to the stone age and freezing in the dark.

    If they shut down 95.1% of electrical production how will you charge your lithium fire bomb battery, very dirty, polluting EV?

    They are pushing EV’s but shutting down electric energy production, it is a trap. Part of agenda 2030 is you will own nothing…..you spend $50,000 + for an EV that is a lawn ornament…..lol….good bye $50,000….now you are broke with no car.

    https://www.bitchute.com/video/X5ZGUWW33FZN/

    from the comments

    ESG is causing this. I build power plants for a living. When the power company shuts down a million dollar a day profiting fully scrubbed coal plant knowing brown outs will be the results it is obvious they care more about investors than Americans lives.

    The results will be suffering and some deaths. It is evil climate fascism being pushed by government. I’m an insider, it is happening. I installed solar panels because I see what is coming. MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A WOOD STOVE AND ENOUGH SOLAR TO RUN A WELL PUMP AND REFRIGERATOR

    What Is ESG?
    (Environmental, Social and Corporate Governance) It’s A Leveraging Tool For The Woke Communist Takeover

    The term “ESG” was originally coined by the United Nations Environment Program Initiative in 2005, but the methodology was not fully applied to the corporate world until the past six years when ESG investment skyrocketed.

    ESG is about money; loans given out by top banks and foundations to companies that meet the guidelines of “stakeholder capitalism.” Companies must show that they are actively pursuing a business environment that prioritizes woke virtues and climate change restrictions.

    These loans are not an all prevailing income source, but ESG loans are highly targeted, they are growing in size (for now) and they are very easy to get as long as a company is willing to preach the social justice gospel as loudly as possible.

    These loans become a form of leverage over the business world – Once they get a taste of that easy money they keep coming back. Many of the loan targets attached to ESG are rarely enforced and penalties are few and far between. Primarily, an ESG funded company must propagandize, that is all. They must propagandize their employees and they must propagandize their customers. As long as they do this, that sweet loan capital keeps flowing.

    The list of companies heavily involved in ESG includes some of the largest in the world, with influence over thousands of smaller businesses. The ESG rating system is much like the social credit scoring system used in communist China to oppress the citizenry.

    The tactic is pretty straightforward – Banking elites are centralizing control of social narratives by incentivising businesses to embrace social justice and globalist ideals, like climate change.

    They control who gets the money and anyone who doesn’t play ball will be at a distinct disadvantage compared to companies that do.

    Businesses not cooperating get starved/pushed out, demonized.

    https://www.zerohedge.com/political/what-esg-its-leveraging-tool-woke-communist-takeover

    • Anon1,

      “MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A WOOD STOVE AND ENOUGH SOLAR TO RUN A WELL PUMP AND REFRIGERATOR…” Yep!

      Also, “ESG” as “Environmental, Social and Governance” even assaults my grammatical sensibilities, consisting of two adjectives and a noun. It should, at least, be “Environmental, Social and Governmental”, or even “Environment, Society and Governance”. :p

  5. Energy losses in an EV:

    The energy losses of all the conversion of going from

    step 1, natural gas, oil, coal or nuclear, boiling water, producing steam, fed through a turbine, turning a generator, generating electricity which

    step 2, goes out through thousands of miles of transmission lines, feeding thousands of miles of distribution lines, then

    step 3, into a house, through a charger, into the vehicle, then

    step 4, through an inverter and into a battery, then into an electric motor, connected to a transmission, then finally the 25% of the energy left from step one is used to push the car down the road.

    Each step of the way energy is lost/wasted, 25% of the energy left from step one is used to push the car down the road. 75% is lost/wasted. While EV’s are just parked they lose another 5% of their charge daily. The average EV gets a real 20.8 mpg.

    The best way to power vehicles is ice engines, not using electricity, it is far too complicated wasteful and inefficient.

    With an ice diesel vehicle the fuel, diesel, is converted into energy inside the very efficient, very clean burning, .0001% emission engine, (much cleaner then the electricity power plant), which is attached to a transmission that uses the energy to push the vehicle down the road. This engine is 50% efficient, only 50% of the energy is lost in conversion. The most efficient diesel gets 73.5 mpg.

    So EV’s aren’t green, they far less efficient and cause more pollution then an ice engine vehicle, plus they have the lithium fire bomb battery problem. They also cost way more, are unsafe, cost more to repair, take too long to recharge and have very expensive battery replacements.

    There won’t be any electricity available to charge them because the grid is already over loaded and it takes 10 to 15 years to expand the grid. Nobody seems to have noticed…lol

    The goal of the push into EV’s appears to be to waste/burn more energy.

  6. As usual, you can thank the government for blackouts after creating a “free market” electricity system. Back in the grunge ’90s the Clinton adminstration pushed through legislation that deregulated the generation of electricity. I vaguely remember thinking that it was sold to the public as a way to pick your own electric supplier, and in some states that became the rule. “Jim’s Jenerators” would sell you your power and somehow the electrons would know they way to get to your home, or something. When Jim shut down for the day what then? Oh, no worries, you’ll still have the same reliable power you have today! Most people didn’t bother switching suppliers. And those who did usually got a too good to be true deal, which later became not such a good deal.

    https://clintonwhitehouse6.archives.gov/1998/03/1998-03-25-electricity-plan-paper.html

    Meanwhile what wasn’t mentioned in the press release is that it established a trading desk for energy futures, near-real time auctions for delivery and constant micromanaging of supply. Great deal for commodities traders, now they had a whole new product to sell. Great deal for bankers, they could underwrite loans for new production. Fantastic deal for Enron, well at least until they got caught.

    Not so good a deal for the grid, or end users. Excess capacity was removed from production and plants decommissioned under the cover of environmentalism. If the bid price wasn’t high enough, no one would sell. And that encourages artificial scarcity. The mythical “Jim’s Jennerators” never materialized due to heavy regulation of engineering, and difficulty in acquiring new capital for baseload power stations. And ultimately bad for the enviroment too, since traditionally baseload power plants are usually the most efficient to operate, especially nuclear and hydro.

    There is an fake equivalent of Jim, however. All those wind farms trashing the horizon are really a Ponzi scheme of sorts, or at least another subprime mortgage scam. Every one of those farms are private corporations. Investors buy in like timeshares, except they buy fractions of wind turbines, with the governement guaranteeing preferential treatment at the exchanges and paying minimums that will often set the market clearing price below $0 just because the wind is blowing at night and no one needs the power. So much for running a baseload power plant.

    Anyone wonder what ever happened to all those Enron traders? Just like the S&L mortgage scammers, they all scattered like the wind into all the big investment banks. Leppards don’t change their spots, they just get better at blending in. When the clearing price on the TX grid maxed out during that cold snap, traders were sitting on derivatives contracts that were worth thousands over the strike price. Nice payout if you were in early. And the traders knew that so they decided to squeeze, even after the pipes thawed and gas started flowing again. The gulible media never pointed out that the banks, while not the orign of the problem, decided to screw Texas for more money. And probably to make Trump look bad too.

  7. I posted this the other day on Eric’s previous thread about California EV mandates. It bears repeating.

    The “elephant in the room” for the whole “EVV revolution is the impact on utility peak demand with EV fast chargers, because a lot of fast chargers will be needed even with many people charging at low levels overnight or at work.

    Let’s say a typical “Quick Mart” has 16 gas pumps. Each gas pump now has a fractional HP pump, maybe a load of 500 Watts per pump. So maybe 8 kW total peak demand.

    Replace those (or add) today’s “fast” chargers, say 16 of those at a nominal 250 kW (that may be on the low end, Tesla’s may be 350 kW).

    16 x 250 = 4,000 kW or 4 MW of connected load. So suddenly every suburban or rural Quick Mart has an electric load (design peak demand) equal to a paper mill, auto assembly plant, or a medium size college campus.

    And if I’m doing my math correctly, a 250 kW charger (with 15% loss) adds a net of about 3.5 kWh per minute to the EV battery, so it will be adding about 12-14 miles range per minute of actual charge time.

    Compare that to my sedan, where I can add over 300 miles of range in about two minutes of actual full time, or 150 miles per minute.

    Either electric or gas cars will have similar time requirements to pull in, park, initiate the process with a payment method, etc. So the actual “fill time” is what is important.

    And further, most EV proponents assume the in the future, new batteries and chargers will be developed that will make EV charging “as convenient” as filling the tank of an IC engine vehicle.

    If that ever becomes reality then the impact on the grid will be monumental – based on simple calculations, the supercharger load will be about 4 megawatts per charger – that is for ONE charger supplying ONE car.

    To put this in perspective, a typical central station power plant can range in output capacity from 600 megawatts to 2,500 megawatts.

    So, ironically, the more improvements we have in EV battery/charging technology, the WORSE it gets for the grid.

    And wind and solar, being non-dispatchable, will do zilch to reliably support the increased demand.

    • Hi Steve,

      Thanks this is great information. I can just imagine someone throwing these numbers around during a discussion with an electric car supporter. Their face would be priceless! God, I love math! It is one of the few areas that still can’t be tampered with involving “feelings or emotions”.

    • Steve – one thing I’ve realised in the west is people dont seem to have a clue what “4MW of connected load” even means. They have no idea what an MW, KW, or even watt is !! They dont realise the kind of connection you need for that sort of load….

    • Hi Steve

      A quote:

      I work in clean energy. I spoke on Friday with a distribution electrical engineer on Friday about this. He has a database of 24,000 electric distribution circuits nationally. He checked and found that 95% of them could not handle two cars charging with these 800 Volt chargers simultaneously.

      Biden’s Infrastructure Bill has billions for electric vehicles, but nothing for where it is needed; upgrading neighborhood electrical circuits so that the cars could be charged without shorting out entire neighborhoods.

      shorting out entire neighborhoods….you will freeze in the dark

      Researchers from the University of California Irvine (UCI) say they are trying to figure out how to provide enough electricity to charge all those cars once the rule comes into effect.

      “The grid does not currently have the capability to add millions of battery-electric vehicles today,” says Jack Brouwer, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at UCI.

      California electric company admits it will NEVER be able to charge everybody’s electric vehicles – NaturalNews.com

  8. The Hummer EV story:

    NOTE: the hummer weighs 9640 lb, it has 1000 hp, the battery weighs 3000 lb.
    top speed 106 mph….lol
    real 10.75 mpg

    ATTENTION: What test drivers got in the Hummer EV:

    Based on it’s highway rating of 43 mpg….. they are getting 1.23 miles of range for every kwh or using 80.69 kwh to go 100 miles. = 43 mpg = 2.32 gallons of gas to go 100 miles.

    (43 mpg = 2.32 gallons of gas, is based on electricity just coming out of a wall plug, in reality 9.30 gallons of fuel or 84 lb of coal were burnt to generate the electricity in the power station = 10.75 mpg).
    So the the Hummer EV gets 10.75 mpg…
    should be a lawsuit claiming 43 mpg….lol.

    travelling 100 miles in a diesel getting 73.5 mpg U.S = 1.36 gallons for 100 miles, no need to waste all that fuel.

    diesel fuel cost per 100 miles = 1.36 gallons @ $4.00 per gallon = $5.44
    Hummer EV fuel cost per 100 miles = 80.69 kwh @ $0.40 = $32.27

    A Tesla owner shared on Twitter the Supercharging rates from the Los Angeles area and indicated that they roughly doubled in the past years. To be sure, the $0.58 per kWh rate is for the peak hours from 11 am to 9 pm, with half that outside this interval.
    In Europe it is $0.72 per kwh…coming here soon…lol

    Twitter users across the U.S. have indicated similar rates, with averages of $0.40 per kwh becoming the norm

    Range: 254 miles under ideal conditions, but you can only use 60% of that range so the real range is 152 miles in ideal conditions, 30 mph, flat road, no wind, 70 degrees out, no accessories on, AC, etc… in very cold weather range drops 50% = 76 miles range….

    NOTE: you can only use 60% of the battery capacity…… between 30% and 90%. using the battery below 30% you can damage the battery, charging above 90% can damage the battery and cause a fire. So you can only use 60% of the range advertised…..

    NOTE:
    40% of electricity in the U.S. comes from coal so the Hummer runs on coal…lol
    Thermal efficiency of power plants using coal, petroleum, natural gas or nuclear fuel and converting it to electricity are around 33% efficiency, natural gas is around 40%. Then there is average 6% loss in transmission, then there is a 5% loss in the charger, another 5% loss in the inverter, the electric motor is 90% efficient so another 10% loss before turning the electricity into mechanical power at the wheels.

    33% – 6% – 5% – 5% – 10% = 25% efficiency for EV’s. In very cold weather EV’s are 12% efficient

    Plus the cost of the battery, which is huge, you have to store the electricity in the very, very expensive battery, that is the killer for EV’s right there, the expensive, rapidly wearing out battery.
    the tesla $22,000 battery is used up, worn out in 100,000 miles. this works out to $22.00 per 100 miles it is costing you for the battery.
    The tesla battery weighs up to 1800 lb,
    the hummer battery is 3000 lb, will it cost $30,000+ ….lol

    ATTENTION: This is really bad….Before the lithium battery EV goes one foot the emissions/pollution just from manufacturing it is equal to driving an ice diesel 89,400 km (50,550 miles), about 7 years driving.
    That is with a 40 kwh battery, some have 90 kwh batteries they are 2x as bad for the environment.

    these test drivers said a full charge on the hummer costs $100.00

    https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a40920160/gmc-hummer-ev-expensive-fillup-charging/?src=socialflowFBCAD&utm_campaign=socialflowFBCD&utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social-media&fbclid=IwAR3F4pEj7FwcA6CHOJddXozQW7KzKGaCPbgY4YxNNgK5ztMGdjgkyO-HXAY

  9. The true extent of the power grid problems in Texas are being masked by an “at all costs” effort by ERCOT and the utility companies to make sure that rolling blackouts do not happen on a mass scale before November and endanger the reelection of the incumbent Governor, who everyone involved believes is a better choice to protect their interests long term than the challenger.

    The conventional wisdom in the state is that a big bailout of the utility companies is coming with the next session of the Texas Legislature in the Spring.

  10. Can’t get the juice for your Tesla in Gina, or Texas awhile back. You can have you damn electric car which is vulnerable to government edict and power outtages.

    1994 Geo Metro EPA window sticker 53 city 58 highway mpg
    https://i.imgur.com/WF8LhgI.jpg

    Note the out-the-door dealer price, only $7590, the cheapest car GM sold that year. The average price of a 1994 car was around $12,400 (see http://www.inthe90s.com/prices.shtml)

    My math says that was around 40% cheaper than average. That means if the Geo Metro was put back into production it would be the cheapest car sold today, AND it would also have the highest non-hybrid fuel economy, AND it would beat probably all the hybrid fuel economies including Prius.

    So tell me, how are all these new cars better? They cost a shit ton of money, cost beaucoup bucks to service, and get worse fuel economy.

    I say hail the Geo Metro, long live the Geo Metro.

    The Geo Metro also uses the most low cost battery sold at Walmart, I just bought one a year ago for $55. They use that same battery in small tractors and 4 wheelers.

    It is also the easiest car I have ever worked on, parts are cheap, available on Amazon. The alternator is the lowest priced one at O’Reilly parts.

    • Hi Jack,

      Yup. Even assuming am inflation-adjusted 2022 MSRP of twice its original cost, the Metro would still be around $16k – which is about $10k less than a Prius.

      The whole thing stinks on account of it’s creepy – as Opie used to say.

      • Hi Eric

        when the engine goes you could do this….

        David Cloud is one such individual who has spent $3000 in converting a 1997 Geo Metro to run on an electric engine fueled by old lead acid batteries.

        The vehicle is powered by 8” ADC motors that are included on each rear wheel and are powered by old 12V lead-acid batteries. The vehicle has a top speed of 72mph and can hit 60mph in 18 seconds, with a range of about 200 miles.

        Someone should build these and sell them, there is a market for them, the new EV’s are $50,000 +

        Lead acid batteries are 100% recycled so are green.

        Only 5% of lithium fire bomb batteries are recycled, plus there is a rumored $4500 recycling fee, so lots will get thrown into the woods…..

        https://ecofriend.com/diy-electric-car-runs-200-miles-on-old-lead-acid-batteries.html

    • The first brand new car I bought was a Chevrolet badged Metro with automatic transmission, 4 door 1999 year model. 2nd cheapest on the lot as I didn’t want the 3 cylinder little brother. That was in NC.

      The second brand new car, bought for cash, when I came back to Scotland, was my Dacia. “nd cheapest to it’s little sister because I wanted a radio. Ironically it DOES have 3 pots but performs admirably imo.

      I might be a cheapskate or wise, I dunno.

  11. Mercedes EV vs VW diesel fuel economy

    A Tesla owner shared on Twitter the Supercharging rates from the Los Angeles area and indicated that they roughly doubled in the past years. To be sure, the $0.58 per kWh rate is for the peak hours from 11 am to 9 pm, with half that outside this interval.
    In Europe it is $0.72 per kwh…coming here soon…lol

    Twitter users across the U.S. have indicated similar rates, with averages of $0.40 becoming the norm

    Mercedes EV with a 90 kwh battery:

    In ideal conditions a mercedes EV used 49.6 kwh per 100 miles = 1.42 gallons of gas at the wall plug = reality 5.7 gallons of fuel burnt at the power plant to make the electricity = 17.5 mpg…so range = about 200 miles, but you can only use 60% of battery capacity so range = 120 miles

    but…….. under ideal conditions …..but at top speed ……a mercedes EV used 90 kwh of electricity in 100 miles which = 3 gallons of gas at the wall plug….back at the power station reality = 12 gallons burnt = 8.3 mpg…….so range = about 100 miles, but you can only use 60% of battery capacity so range = 60 miles

    NOTE: you can only use 60% of the battery capacity…… between 30% and 90%. using the battery below 30% you can damage the battery, charging above 90% can damage the battery and cause a fire. So you can only use 60% of the range advertised…..

    Under other not ideal conditions the EV efficiency drops a lot, might use twice as much energy to go 100 miles. Using the electric heater, heated seats, AC, stereo, and the rear defroster and wipers, or towing something in an EV reduces range too.

    In very cold conditions the battery range can drop 50%. so same result… 90 kwh of electricity used in 100 miles which = 3 gallons of gas at the wall plug….back at the power station reality = 12 gallons burnt = 8.3 mpg……so range = about 100 miles, but you can only use 60% of battery capacity so range = 60 miles

    but what if you go top speed, flat out in very cold weather what would it be?….lol….what if you are towing something?….lol

    travelling 100 miles in a diesel getting 73.5 mpg U.S = 1.36 gallons for 100 miles, no need to waste all that fuel.

    diesel fuel cost per 100 miles = 1.36 gallons @ $4.00 per gallon = $5.44
    mercedes EV fuel cost per 100 miles = 49.4 kwh @ $0.40 = $19.40

    EV fuel savings…hahaha

    There is an additional cost for the EV owner: the tesla $22,000 battery is used up, worn out in 100,000 miles. this works out to $22.00 per 100 miles it is costing you for the battery.

    mercedes EV fuel cost per 100 miles = 49.4 kwh @ $0.40 = $19.40…plus $22.00 for the battery use = $41.40….lol
    the diesel owner paid $5.44 to go 100 miles….lol

    EV’s are very expensive to own.

    Thermal efficiency of power plants using coal, petroleum, natural gas or nuclear fuel and converting it to electricity are around 33% efficiency, natural gas is around 40%. Then there is average 6% loss in transmission, then there is a 5% loss in the charger, another 5% loss in the inverter, the electric motor is 90% efficient so another 10% loss before turning the electricity into mechanical power at the wheels.

    33% – 6% – 5% – 5% – 10% = 25% efficiency for EV’s.
    (under not ideal conditions it might be 12% efficient).

    An Ev is 25% efficient in turning original source of energy, petroleum in this example into mechanical energy to push the car down the road.

    On a race track driven at ten tenths a tesla used 80 miles range in 8 miles, a 90% drop in range, not 50% driven fast EV’s get very bad fuel economy…….

    burning 5.7 gallons of fuel to go 100 miles is cleaner, safer, less wasteful then burning 1.36 gallons of fuel?

    Why are they pushing EV’s? They use twice the fuel so pollute twice as much…

    They advertise EV’s getting 102 mpg….they should be sued, it is impossible using the technology they use, it is another huge lie….
    (because they quote mpg at the wall plug, before the wall plug fairies and unicorns make the electricity….lol)

    The switch to EV’s has nothing to do with fuel economy or less pollution it is all about control and limiting/stopping mobility.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6BSdq-MpPdg&t=113s

  12. The goal was immediately evident, when they started demanding EV use first, before cranking up grid capacity. The Psychopaths In Charge have no intent to allow you to actually drive one of the EVs they demand you buy. The US grows ever closer to China in its method, while proclaiming the evils of China. We approach a point of intersection, where there’s no significant difference between one and the other.

  13. An interesting thing I learnt about batteries on my trip to Pakistan – basically how shit they are. Out there, load shedding or breakdowns are a regular part of life, and going without power for hours (or some areas even days) is expected, so people make their own arrangements form backup generators to solar to battery powered UPS’s, which is what my parents have. The advantage of the UPS is they dont need to refuel, it takes less space, and makes no noise (which is important for them). The downside however is (despite cheaper recharges than a tank of diesel) the batteries go bad really quick. A good battery lasts about 1 year, after which it starts loosing charge and at about 2 years is basically useless. Which is basically what happened this time when I went – they normally dont use it (as they dont get many power cuts and just dont bother for the brief ones they have). But due to the monsoons, power went more and when they tried turning it on after about 6 months – it was dead!!
    I can only imagine how this will be in cars…. and I dont ever anticipate a pizza delivery boy turning up in an old electric beater !!

    • ‘load shedding or breakdowns are a regular part of life, and going without power for hours (or some areas even days) is expected, so people make their own arrangements from backup generators to solar to battery powered UPSs’ — Nasir

      Blighty goes Pakistan:

      Once a week, energy traders hop on a call with UK’s electricity network operator, National Grid.

      Here are a series of questions from power traders from last week’s call:

      “Are you war-gaming possible options for if/when cross-border trading collapses under security of supply pressures this winter?”

      And another: “Can we have a session where we talk through the emergency arrangements?”

      Another participant said that the forecast for demand-and-supply electricity balance showed “how bad the winter could be for anyone who can do the maths.”

      UK power prices for winter are going parabolic at about £1,000 per megawatt hour, up from £242 in June.

      https://tinyurl.com/ycxah8mp

      EeeVee fashion victims who think this pressure doesn’t get transmitted to the Homeland are grievously mistaken.

      LNG exports from Texas and Louisiana to Rotterdam and Dunkerque are the transmission belt which telegraphs Europe’s dire plight to the US-fuckin-A, via soaring natgas prices.

      Smash the grid.

      • I’ve already seen that in my gas bills; I’m on the equal payment plan and was paying about $220/month, just got notified it’s going up to $390/month. Sure making Putin pay 😆

        • Mike, back in March, the press told us all that polling showed Amerikans were willing to pay more at the pump to support Ukraine. I guess you were not among them? Also wonder how that’s working out for those polled. Putin probably has had several hernia operations from laughing so hard at us and the euroweenies.

  14. Not sure if you’re following whats happening in Spain – the government has mandated that you cant turn your HVACs below 27 in the summer and above 19 in the winter… as there is too much load. At the same time as the EU has mandated moving to electric cars. I cant believe how dumb people are to not see through this !!

    • Hi Nasir,

      I think they’re too afraid to be perceived as questioning the faith… of “climate change”… which is the new “granny is going to die unless you wear a maaaaaaaaaaaaaaaask.”

    • Nasir
      As a child I noticed most just laughed at government attempts to edict stupidity. They were smart enough at the time to figure our the BS.

      Fast forward seventy years and four generations of gov indoctrination camps and you end up with what has to be the dumbest go along to get along sheeples on the planet. The new belief is gov knows all,,, and even if wrong you need to comply or the paid gunslinger comes to take you away. Not to mention the new generations have to use machines to determine simple change or do other simple math or have the slightest bit of true history under their belts.

      Even with the borrowed educated cream of the cream folks from around the world the US is years behind Russia and China. Take hypersonics,,, The US finally got a missile to actually fly while Russia and China have them in use and are working on the third generation. Trouble is the US no longer has is the nazi scientists,,, they all died off,,, to design and build the high tech stuff. It’s woke education system cannot compete with other nations because any competition is considered racist or misogynist or some other woke excuse.

      The US and West are going the way of the Dodo bird.

      • Ken – I agree. It is sad seeing how dumbed down the majority have become… what to do is what I’m thinking. For now I am trying to make sure my kids are well travelled and well read (in the proper sense) and able to make their own decisions…

      • “Take hypersonics,,, The US finally got a missile to actually fly while Russia and China have them in use and are working on…”

        Ken,
        Apples and oranges. American and Chinese hypersonics are airbreathers…Russia’s hypersonics are just missiles…all missles are hypersonic…everybodys. Scramjet technology Russia does not have, and China’s have not been closely studied.

  15. ‘there is more than enough oil to power every non-electric car on the planet’ — eric

    Even climate cranks acknowledge this fact. But having defined carbon dioxide as a pollutant in Manchin’s Law (the thermodynamic counterpart of Megan’s Law), they dictate that a near-limitless energy source is Haram (religiously forbidden).

    It’s fanaticism on a witch-burning, Galileo-prosecuting scale. People will die as a consequence of shutting down hydrocarbon energy use. Grannies will freeze in the dark in Europe this winter.

    But this is a crusade for the greater good. Some eggs, regrettably, must be broken to make a climate-virtuous omelette.

    They bought a souped-up jitney
    It was a cherry-red fifty-three
    Drove it down to New Orleans
    To celebrate the anniversary

    It was there that Pierre
    Was wedded to the lovely mademoiselle
    C’est la vie, say the old folks
    It goes to show you never can tell

    — Emmylou Harris, C’est la Vie

      • Hi Eric

        VW e-Golf Battery Replacement Cost
        The cost of a replacement battery for a 2017 to 2018 VW e-Golf is said to be $23,442.91 by Pignataro VW in August 2021. Given that the 2017 e-golf battery pack has 35.8 kWh, the cost per kilowatt hour is $654,

        the tesla $22,000 battery is used up, worn out in 100,000 miles. this works out to $22.00 per 100 miles it is costing you for the battery.
        The tesla battery weighs up to 1800 lb,

        the hummer battery is 3000 lb, will it cost $30,000+ ….lol

        GM Volt battery replacement = $26,800

      • be sure to mention the odometer reading lolrofl

        That Chevy Volt only had 70,000 miles on it! And needs a $30,000 battery job!

        The owner got screwed, and those idiots in California just mandated all electric cars in 12 years. We are all going to get screwed by this greenshit tidalwave.

      • Eric, this thing looks suspicious, and a quick internet search reveals that there are lots of skeptics.
        For one thing, the form says “Repair Estimate” and “Customer Quote,” so it is not an invoice. Did the owner get it fixed? That would be extremely stupid, since you can get a new Bolt for less than this estimate.
        And who is the owner? Shouldn’t the name and address be filled in? It’s one thing to black it out, but it’s obvious that it was never there in the first place. And why no dealer address and phone number? Other fields that would routinely be filled in are missing as well.
        Anybody with some computer skills could create a form like this, print it, crumple it a bit, and take a picture for the internet. EVs have plenty of solidly documented shortcomings, so it seems unwise to risk credibility by citing something as iffy as this.
        To alter an old saying: If a document seems too supportive of your argument to be real, it’s probably fake.

        • Hi Roland,

          Someone else posted this; I haven’t had time yet to investigate it. That said, I know EV replacement batteries are very expensive. Examples include the $14k-plus for a replacement Chevy Bolt battery and even more for a Tesla. I will try to find out what it costs to replace a Volt battery. It may be very high due to the Volt’s unique architecture. I’ll see what I can find…

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