Six Delaware “heroes” Who Did Not Say No to Drugs

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A State Highway Patrol trooper is among six men charged with drug trafficking in Delaware County, accused of dealing and providing cover for other dealers.

The federal charges announced Tuesday include possession of controlled substances with intent to distribute, distribution of controlled substances and conspiracy-related charges, said Benjamin C. Glassman, U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Ohio in Columbus.

An investigation begun in June by the Delaware County Drug Task Force and the FBI followed suspected dealer Nicholas Glassburn, 47, of Delaware, which officials say led to his sources and suppliers, including Trooper Jason Delcol.

Delcol, 43, and Benjamin Owings, 37, both of Delaware, are each charged with crimes related to the sale of a human growth hormone. Delcol is charged with an additional count of witness tampering.

Delcol, a trooper since 2001, had good reviews until 2012, when he was fired for illegal narcotics use. He told his superiors that he needed the drugs for back pain. He was given a second chance, which he failed in 2014 and again was fired. He was given his job back a second time as a result of an arbitration hearing.

Others charged include: Carlos Carvalho, 42, of Sandusky, and William Covrett, 41, whose address was not available, each on charges of money laundering; and Stevedore Crawford, 55, of Columbus, on intent to distribute and distribution charges.

According to an affidavit in the criminal complaint, Delcol was believed to be a middleman for Glassburn’s dealing, both receiving and providing drugs to Glassburn and others, and helping Glassburn evade law enforcement.

Glassman said Delcol “used his position as a law-enforcement officer to provide Glassburn with information, intervene in criminal cases of Glassburn and Owings, provide Glassburn with ballistic vests, and corroborate Glassburn’s alibi to law enforcement when Glassburn was caught transporting drugs in August 2017.”

The drugs included HGH, testosterone, Xanax, Oxycodone, Percocet, Adderall, Suboxone, cocaine, crack cocaine and marijuana, the affidavit states.

Delcol provided Glassburn with the protective vests before Glassburn met with Carvalho, whom he owed$17,000 for marijuana, records show. Carvalho likely was one of Glassburn’s main sources for drugs, the affidavit reported.

Undercover surveillance showed Delcol visiting Glassburn’s home at least 16 times since October 2017, including twice in his marked patrol cruiser. The two men also were recorded discussing selling drugs.

On Aug. 5, 2017, at about 4:30 a.m., police in Morrow County found Glassburn asleep at the wheel of a vehicle with a drug pipe in the back seat. Cocaine and a cocaine base also were found.

Glassburn told police he was tired and had found the drugs in one of his children’s bedrooms. He said he called Delcol, a friend, and asked for advice.

A deputy had Glassburn call Delcol to verify the story. Delcol told the deputy that Glassburn “had children who were problems and also said he did not know Glassburn to be involved with drugs.” During a recorded follow-up call with police, Delcol again defended Glassburn.

All but Covrett are in custody pending detention hearings set for Thursday at the federal courthouse in Columbus.

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Author of "Automotive Atrocities" and "Road Hogs" (MBI). Currently living amongst the Edentulites in rural SW Virginia.


    • Hi Kent,

      Ordinarily, I’d agree. These acts aren’t crimes in the moral sense. The issue – as you know, of course – is that these thugs caged and abused people for doing the same things.

      One obvious reform that will never be enacted is that every single conviction based upon the testimony/evidence adduced by such “heroes” be thrown out as presumptively tainted.

      That’d get the ball rolling – which is why it’ll never happen.