Sadistic Drunken Hero Beats Dog

8
1343
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Here’s a video of a drunken Hero – Deputy Brett Berry of the Ramsey County Sheriff’s Office – doling out some law and order to a dog.

Berry was visiting the Black Bear Casino in Carlton, MN, while attending Hero training during K-9 trials in June (2015). He was thrown out of the casino for being drunk and making unwanted advances, as well as repeatedly making obscene gestures to the staff there. Shortly after he was observed by casino security on surveillance video (embedded below) abusing his K-9 partner.

Via Asa’s Original post:

The surveillance footage shows an obviously upset Berry pick the animal up by its collar, throw it on the ground, and repeatedly punch it in the face.

The docile canine can been seen trotting beside its handler, waging its tail, as it endures abuse that would make any pet owner cringe.

After the attack escalates, the dog is able to escape, and runs back to the casino. The footage shows Berry run after the animal before striking it multiple times outside a vestibule, police say.

After the security guards reported his assault upon the dog to the Carlton County Sheriff’s Office,  Berry was sent home from the K-9 trials, placed on administrative leave (also known as paid vacation) and charged with animal cruelty. He was subsequently sentenced to (just) a year of probation.

In April, he was fired by the Ramsey County Sheriff’s Office.

However, on October 31 an arbitrator ruled that Berry should be reinstated, because this is the only time he has been caught on camera savagely beating a dog and he said he feels really bad about it.

Apparently, someone who has a documented history of resorting to violence when angry doesn’t pose a threat to the public while working as a cop. Instead, he will be on double secret probation and will not be allowed to work with K-9’s anymore.

Via the Twin Cities Pioneer Press:

In a decision filed Monday, state arbitrator Gil Vernon wrote that the sheriff’s office did not sufficiently consider mitigating factors when it moved to fire Berry, and those factors show Berry is at a low risk of future misconduct. He noted that Berry had been forthright about his behavior that night and he sought alcohol abuse treatment afterward.

“The record shows he has nearly 20 years of incident-free service with good evaluations,” Vernon wrote. “He spontaneously, contritely, sincerely and without equivocation accepted his responsibility. Next he without prompting moved immediately to address his underlying personal issues.”

Vernon noted that the canine Boone suffered no physical injuries, and several of Berry’s supervisors said they expected no problems if he returned to service.

Vernon ordered that Berry be reinstated to active duty immediately but with the restriction that he cannot work with canines. He also ruled that the county does not have to repay Berry the back wages he lost since his termination in April.

“The permanency of his reinstatement is dependent on the successful completion of the terms of his misdemeanor probation,” Vernon wrote. “Based on (Berry’s) record and reaction to this incident, the Arbitrator is convinced that it was an aberration and that he deserves another (but last) chance to resume his career.”

In addition, Sean Gormley, the head of Law Enforcement Labor Services of Minnesota, Berry’s local police union, stated, “Officer Berry has the support of his fellow officers, and we believe he can still be an asset to his department and to the people of Ramsey County,” because it’s almost impossible to do something (outside of exposing corruption within the department) that would eliminate that support.

Share Button

8 COMMENTS

  1. Why did this filthy pig not get charged with assaulting a police dog? If any mundane did that to a police dog they would most certainly be charged as such.

  2. Hi Todd,

    The rewrite is for you. I’d like to know if you think things are still tolerable when the second one is a real story.

    “California resident Gerilynn Aflleje was horrified when her 4-year-old Siberian Husky mix was killed by a local animal shelter over $180 in fees that she couldn’t afford.
    Her dog, Chunk, had been dropped off at the Stockton shelter after getting lost in 2013, she later explained at a city council meeting. When Aflleje discovered her dog there less than a week later, she said the shelter demanded $180 within 24 hours for storing Chunk.
    Unemployed, Aflleje couldn’t get the money in time. “We didn’t only lose our pet. We lost a family member,” she said.
    In a number of cities across the country, animal control agencies are aggressively going after pet owners with big fines for small violations. Some hold people’s pets until they settle their bills, even if it means they end up killed. Others leave the dogs alone but issue arrest warrants for owners who can’t pay up.
    The infractions can include failing to license a pet, owning a dog that barks a lot, or accidentally letting an animal get loose in the neighborhood. But the penalties are serious, often amounting to hundreds or even thousands of dollars.
    So are the consequences. When owners of seized or lost dogs can’t afford to get their pets back, they relinquish their rights to the animal, which can result in a pet being euthanized. Meanwhile, a CNNMoney analysis of active warrants from a sampling of 15 cities and counties across the country found thousands of outstanding warrants for small pet-related offenses.”

    The future news.

    California resident Gerilynn Aflleje was horrified when her 4-year-old son was killed by a local child welfare agency over $180 in fees that she couldn’t afford.
    Her son, Chuck, had been dropped off at the Stockton DCFS after getting lost in 2013, she later explained at a city council meeting. When Aflleje discovered her son there less than a week later, she said the shelter demanded $180 within 24 hours for housing Chuck.
    Unemployed, Aflleje couldn’t get the money in time. “We didn’t only lose our son. We lost a family member,” she said.
    In a number of cities across the country, child welfare agencies are aggressively going after parents with big fines for small violations. Some hold people’s kids until they settle their bills, even if it means they end up killed. Others leave the children alone but issue arrest warrants for parents who can’t pay up.
    The infractions can include talking on a cell phone at school, possession of cuticle scissors, or pointing a hand like a gun. But the penalties are serious, often amounting to hundreds or even thousands of dollars.
    So are the consequences. When parents of seized or lost children can’t afford to get their kids back, they relinquish their parental rights, which can result in a child being euthanized. Meanwhile, a CNNMoney analysis of active warrants from a sampling of 15 cities and counties across the country found thousands of outstanding warrants for small child-related offenses.

    “The future just ain’t what it used to be
    It’s never gonna be like it was
    The future just ain’t what it used to be
    I wish it wouldn’t come but it does
    I wish it wouldn’t come but it always does
    – JIM STEINMAN “

  3. I thought the p”heroes” treated the K-9s identically as people when looking for charges to hold against others.

    TRENTON — A city man who was charged with assaulting a police dog during an arrest over a stolen car in July appeared in court today.
    http://www.nj.com/mercer/index.ssf/2014/08/trenton_man_charged_with_harming_police_dog_during_arrest_over_stolen_car.html

    For just the second time in the three years since a law came into effect, Durham Region police have arrested a man on charges of harming a police dog.
    https://www.thestar.com/news/crime/2012/03/28/man_charged_after_police_dog_punched_and_kicked.html

    I guess that only applies if one is a mundane.

LEAVE A REPLY