Creepbook

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Facebook wants your face – literally.

Have a look at the image accompanying this rant. It is popping up when Facebook users access their page. That creepy Zuckerberg kid – who isn’t one anymore but is even creepier than he was when he became the . .  . face of this Deep State data-mining/surveillance and (soon) control grid wants to watch you while you’re on Facebook. And correlate your face with images of it that appear anywhere else that’s digitized.

It’s reality TeeVee – with you as the star. Only you’re not being paid. Instead, you’re being used. Your data, to compile a “consumer” profile tailored to your consuming, so as to direct the appropriate spiels your way – without so much as a discount from the sordid peddlers pushing their wares in front of your  . . . face.

And once Facebook has your face, they can use it – along with their algorithms – to compile (and maintain) a record of where you’ve been and what you were doing there. Your habits and inclinations. Everything that can be seen.

Remember: There are cameras almost everywhere now. Including in your new car. (Subaru wants to keep track of your face; others are following).

And if these cameras are connected to the Internet, what they see, Facebook sees.

And Zuckerberg knows.

If Facebook recognizes your face, the Creepy Kid knows you were at that coffee shop down the street or getting something at Lowes. And exactly when you were there as well as how long.

He knows that you frowned when you were reading a story about  . . . Facebook. Bad, very bad. It’s all being inventoried for later.

Just wait.

Now, more than ever, there’s reason to put a piece of black electrical tape over tat little keyhole just above your screen (that’s where the camera is) so that Facebook can’t see your face.

Better yet, stop using Facebook entirely.

Why anyone still does who isn’t a kind of real-life Eloi too childish and simple-minded to understand the game that’s afoot is astonishing.

It was only 30 years go that people in East Germany risked being shot to escape the Stasi – the analog-era Facebook. Today, people willingly turn over the most intimate details of their private lives to an entity far more powerful because far more pervasive and much more sinister for just that reason.

In East Germany, one had merely to pretend to be a good communist; to not say anything openly out of school. There might be a bug in the bedroom, so one had to be careful, of course.

Today, put the bug in their own bed.

. . .

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13 COMMENTS

  1. Remember photo day every year at school PreK – 12? Then every 5 years or so for a DL? 10 for a passport? Government already has your photo. Work ID photo? Corporations have your photo. Their software is going to do what is going to do regardless. Sure maybe a few more photos helps it a bit, but them not being around isn’t going to change what these control freaks have in mind.

  2. Maddening isn’t it?

    That people pay good money to festoon themselves and their homes with surveillance gadgets that would have made the NKVD blush.

  3. And everyone these days (Me included) carries a tracking device in their pocket in the form of a cell phone. It’s always tracking, listening and keeping a record.

    • Speak for yourself. I don’t have a smartphone. I do have a simple pay-as-you-go flip phone with a removable battery. (It is turned off – with battery removed – most of the time. No tracking, listening, or recording unless I choose to turn it on.) I know quite a few people who have no cell phone at all.

      • Morning, Jason!

        I got one – a sail fawn – after I got divorced, so about three years ago now. Mainly because it’s almost impossible to date without one. But I am close to the edge of giving up on that and if I do – and I can get away without having one for work (the other issue) I could live without one as well. The main downside for me is that all my friends have one, too – and it’s the expected means of communication now.

        • Gosh I thought I was the only one left. I still use a … gasp… landline. I pay alot of taxes & fees for it too — the phone company charges ~$25, but the gov charges ~$25 too, gotta love how the gov gets the same/more money than the phone company.

          I have a free cell (from Consumer Cellular) only for car emergencies, otherwise don’t use it. I’m scared those things might fry my brain cells. And brain cells are very important to my survival and quality of life lol. I can’t afford to be stupid and rely on others to take care of me, I’m on my own — no kids or wife or family.

          • Hi Harry,

            I gave in about three years ago, shortly after my divorce. I got a sail fawn, mainly because it is almost impossible to date these days without one. Also because the land line is more expensive, a factor in my post-divorce life. I got a $35 sail fawn at Wal Mart and pay $35 a month for the service. I use it to make calls and – yes, egads – send texts. Which I ruefully admit I’ve become as used to doing as almost everyone else. I would not be doing any of this if I were in position to live in a cabin and forget all this – the government, endless taxes, AGWs and now muh muh muh Corona. But because of the divorce and the endless taxes I have to work and socialize and neither are realistically feasible in these times without dey sail fawn.

  4. There there is another way. I’m also a member of NoAgendaSocial.com, which is a Mastodon instance run by the No Agenda podcast network (or whatever it is, NAS is not run by Adam Curry). It’s semi-closed but easy to get an invite. It’s also part of the Mastodon federation so if you know someone on another instance you can follow them. For example, Gab.com recently rewrote most of their back end using the Mastodon software, so you can follow anyone who’s on Gab using @ScreenName@gab.com.

    Anyone can start their own Mastodon server. The admins of the server control who they choose to federate with, and there are plenty of whitelists available, most of them politically motivated (and seriously millennial in scope), but there’s no requirement to do any server-level blocking. Most of the apps and web interface will show a global or local timeline, or just the people you follow (pro tip: Don’t look at the global feed if it isn’t whitelisted, it seems like it’s seeded with a bunch of porn, possible links to malware and disgusting images).

    I think this is probably the way social media will settle out in the long run. Imagine a federation of churches, or neighborhood servers (policed by the community members themselves), or even (gasp) subscription servers you pay for access to (and in exchange the admins keep the riffraff out). I’m sure at some point if it gets popular someone will be sued for not allowing someone to join their instance or whatever, but until then the freedom to associate with whom you wish still applies.

    Right now people know full well the meaning of the saying “When you don’t pay for the product, you are the product,” but they don’t care. When FB runs out of road and stops 10% YOY growth, most people will start seeing more ad content, and get constantly henpecked to keep active. It won’t be fun anymore, it will be a chore. That’s when the masses will move on. Or maybe it will devolve into the digital version of that old rundown strip mall with the Goodwill store, tobacco shop and greasy spoon diner. Sure, it still makes money for someone but how?

  5. I submit that Mark Zuckerberg is a human trafficker. As is Google.
    I wrote a blog to that effect (I’d link to it but all my links get flagged as spam) which got some pushback. Apparently, some people don’t believe you own any of your data.

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