A Post Mortem Harass & Collect

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An elderly California man was found dead in his home by armed government workers who performed a “wellness check” after the 70-year-old hadn’t been heard from in awhile and concerned family members asked them to make sure he was ok.

Later, one of the AGWs – Steve Hortz – returned to help himself to the dead man’s stuff, including 15 firearm, a gun safe, a ceiling fan and other valuables – which he can be seen carting away by hand on dolly on closed-circuit security camera.

As CBS Los Angeles reports:

In the first incident, Hortz returned to the home July 27 and allegedly broke into the unoccupied residence through the rear and left a short time later. It was unclear if Hortz, who was in uniform at the time, left with any property from the home.

Hortz then returned to the home on the mornings of Aug. 10 and 16 in civilian clothes and allegedly removed items including weapon safes, ceiling fans and cases containing unknown items.

OCSD immediately launched an investigation into the burglaries as soon as they were reported. Hortz was arrested the morning of Sept. 10 and was booked into the Santa Ana Jail on suspicion of burglary. He was also placed on administrative leave, and the department said it was investigating prior calls Hortz handled to see if similar instances had occurred.

The AGW has been charged with various felonies   – including grand theft and second-degree burglary. However the AGW was not fired.

As often happens in “cases” such as this, he was placed on paid vacation – styled “administrative leave” – notwithstanding video of him breaking, entering and stealing.

This predator – like all predators – has almost certainly victimized any others, similarly. Will there be an investigation? Will any of the convictions based on the testimony of this AGW be revisited?

It’s about as likely as Fauci saying it’s all clear; everyone can take off their Face Diapers and go back to living.

. . . .

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12 COMMENTS

  1. Why would he be fired? After all, this particular crime he committed pales in comparison to those of whom he works for. His employers don’t have a job if they don’t constantly commit armed robbery, aka taxes and fees. I seriously doubt this particular bugler stole as much as gubmint agents “legally” stole from the deceased in any given year.

    • Why would he be fired? He is a member of a government union which imposes powerful barriers to firing ANY of its members, even if they lie, steal and kill in broad daylight.

      And this is ‘anything goes, nothing matters’ Kalifornia, where you can drop your drawers and defecate on the sidewalk if so inclined, after shoplifting a few stores and injecting some heroin to help the time pass by.

      • Yes, you can take a dump on the city sidewalk, but you’d better not be smoking a Marlboro while you’re doing it. THAT will get you thrown in jail. Doobies are ok though.

  2. Sheriffs too, stories are told about sheriffs having a house full of collectibles from country homes and farms. Nothing is sacred, life is a gamble.

    I burned a stretch of tall grass one day a few years ago. The wind was from the north at 3 mph, I let the fahr burn to the south of the farmyard.

    A little later, the fire backburned to the north, before I knew it, a hay bale was on fire, bad news. It is impossible to douse a hay bale on fire, it will burn no matter what.

    I was soot covered head to toe before I finally called the fire department.

    When it was all over, a good seven acres of charred hayfield was the result. There was an amphibious firefighting vehicle at the scene dousing out hot spots.

    A total of three firefighting vehicles were there along with the amphibious all-terrain vehicle, one got stuck in the mud.

    “We’ll do this one for practice,” is what the volunteer firefighter said.

    Could have burned a whole square mile and a small town had it not been brought under control.

    When you need help, be thankful it is there.

    • Hi Bart,

      In principle, fire fighting is noble work. The problem arises, as always, when government gets involved and force – via authoritah -is applied.

      Let’s say a few men – and even able women – get together, voluntarily, and decide to volunteer as local firemen. They go around and raise funds; people are offered the option to subscribe to the service for an annual fee. This covers them in the same manner that having an on-call plumber would. But no one is forced to subscribe. People have the option to run the risk of a fire that might just burn their house down since the fire department would not be obliged to come put it out. (There could also be “fee for service” alternative; i.e., you only pay for the service if you use it – but if you do use it, you’re obliged to pay for it.)

      The key point here is that everything is voluntary. They cannot force you to pay if you wish to decline their services and they ave no authoritah over your property. You can tell them to go away if you wish – and they are obliged to obey.

      That takes care of the problem.

      • Most fire departments in the USA were actually founded and once funded by insurance companies. It made sense for that since it would lower the risk of insuring for fire. But of course government stuck it’s nose in and we got what we got today.

        There are a few private fire departments left. In my area, the BP refinery (Amoco) has it’s own. It’s actually the department most local firefighters want to work for since it’s the elite of firefighting. They are experts at chemical fires for obvious reasons, and often help the local municipal departments.

        There really is no reason why insurance companies funding fire departments couldn’t be the case again.

    • Here are two stories of firefighter arrogance, and is a good reason why “qualified immunity”should be abolished for ALL public workers and officials:

      A firefighter from a certain southeastern Michigan community claimed to have a “arson dog”–one that could detect accelerants. This “firefighter” and his dog were instrumental in ruining many peoples’ lives by his testimony alone. Insurance companies LOVED this guy as he was able to get them out of paying (valid) claims. People were denied valid insurance claims and prosecuted for arson on the testimony of this “arson dog’s” handler.

      Those who were “burned” (no pun intended) by this supposed arson dog’s “handler” had no recourse, because of “qualified immunity”. The firefighter (and fire department) could not be sued.

      Finally one citizen who had been accused of arson fought back by suing to prove the “arson dog’s” ability. The dog was found to have NO special ability. The “arson dog” and his human master’s career was finally over. How many innocent people were convicted of arson and lost everything they owned??

      Another case was that of a plating plant that caught fire. The owners had a fire department “approved” fire plan in place which involved shutting off utilities and shutting down processes in an orderly fashion. The firefighters that responded to the fire pushed the owner out of the way, and told him that they were going to do things “their way”. The building burned to the ground.

      A firefighter’s job (for at least 98% of the time) is not inherently dangerous. This does not take away from the seriousness of their job, which is to be commended. but, firefighter arrogance can be just as dangerous as police arrogance. THIS is why firefighters should be included in the abolition of immunity for public officials.

    • Hi SM777!

      Both terms work for me; the object being to get across the point that these AGWs (and BCCs) do not “serve” – or “protect” us but rather serve the government and protect themselves.

  3. And when the police officer dressed in his uniform to start his shift, he gazed into the mirror imagining himself as Judge Dredd and said in a loud voice “I AM THE LAW”! Big heads and big attitudes dominate law enforcement to our detriment. Crooked cops are as common as losing lottery tickets these days.

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